Earbud makers have been busy doing away with wires—a good thing whether or not your phone still has a headset jack. You no longer have to deal with cords if you don’t want to. True wireless earbuds connect to one another and your audio source via Bluetooth.

No wires mean no inline microphones or controls, but truly wireless earbuds sound just as good as traditional Bluetooth counterparts (for better or worse). They also boast all of the features we’ve come to expect from earbuds designed to work with your smartphone, tablet, or PC.

Since Apple’s AirPods became a runaway hit, an endless stream of companies have rolled out their own true wireless earbuds and earphones. As you might expect, not all of them are worth your time or money—so we’ve got your back with buying suggestions to meet a wide variety of needs.

To read this article in full, please click here

from Macworld https://ift.tt/2Ntq8Se
https://ift.tt/1lhrOHv

The indicator lights for active Ethernet connections might help you troubleshoot problems with a Wi-Fi router. While Wi-Fi and Ethernet may seem like two utterly different pieces of technology, they combine in a wireless router, in which the device’s software interconnects networking traffic across the two types—and on some models, across a third via DSL or cable standards.

That can provide a problem if the Wi-Fi part of the gateway remains active and healthy, meaning that client devices, like smartphones and laptops, can connect to the network and report back that everything’s fine, but the Internet connection appears dead.

I’ve found frequently that when a Wi-Fi router appears at fault, Ethernet is the actual culprit. While Ethernet is an extremely reliable and long-running technology, cables fail through wear (if you move them around) and over time. It’s especially a difficult issue when Ethernet is threaded through the walls of your home. (Some homes were also wired long enough ago that they use an older standard of Ethernet cable that can’t consistently support gigabit Ethernet signalling.)

To read this article in full, please click here

from Macworld https://ift.tt/2HmpOUv
https://ift.tt/1lhrOHv

When people roll out wish lists of things they wish Apple would do to its products, they’re often focused on brand new features. We all like new features, sure, but part of me worries that while the focus is on the shiny, the basics—the software that we’re all using everyday—gets ignored. In particular, I’m really ready for Apple to tackle that old standby: Mail.

I know: email’s dead, supplanted by a myriad of other means of digital communication. Except, for many of us, email is still something that we’re unavoidably attached to when it comes to corresponding with people, signing up for accounts, and archiving or doing a to-do list.

Apple expended a lot of effort developing tools in iOS 12 that let us spend less time on our devices by preventing us from using them at certain times. But what about all that time where we are using our smartphones, tablets, and computers? Maybe there are features that can help us be more efficient, and treat our time with the respect it deserves.

To read this article in full, please click here

from Macworld https://ift.tt/2EJkXcR
https://ift.tt/1lhrOHv