A Bosch Router table and router mounted on a wooden base.
Josh Hendrickson

If you already own a woodworking router, you probably want to make the most of it. While you can use the tool freehand, for greater precision, you should consider a router table. You’ll have an easier time with intricate cuts.

What to Look for in a Router Table

Before you purchase a router table, you want to check some of its key components. The shape, size, materials, fence, and accessories vary from table to table, and those things make the difference between a poor option and an inexpensive but good choice.

  • Flat, Rigid Top: The top of your router table should be very flat and rigid. You don’t want a table that bends as you push material across it—that could ruin the cut. Most routers use either melamine (or MDF), cast aluminum, or in some rare cases, cast iron. All three are good options, though the latter two are more durable.
  • Flat, Metal Base Plate: Nearly every router table includes a base plate for attaching your router. The plate should be flat, very rigid, and made of metal. The table should also include a way to level the plate to the rest of the top.
  • An Easy to Adjust Fence: For many of your router cuts, you’ll want a fence to guide the material along the router bit. The fence should be easy to adjust and tighten down with two to four large knobbed screws. Nicer tables will include a two-piece split fence that lets you adjust the hole in the middle. You can also set split fences to join wood.
  • Dust Ports: Routing wood creates a ton of sawdust, and if you don’t do something about it, you’ll quickly have trouble sliding your material along the tabletop. Dust ports let you connect a shop vac or other vacuum solution to suck the sawdust out. Look for one at the fence and maybe a second beneath the table by the router.
  • Sturdy base: The last thing you want is your table to shift while you’re pushing the wood through the router bit. Shifting will cause your cut to drift and potentially ruin your piece. A sturdy base should prevent shifting.
  • Miter slot: Similar to a table saw’s miter slots, the router tabletop should have at least one slot cut into it, running parallel with the router and fence. You can attach feather boards and miter gauges as needed for a safe cut. Some routers may have additional slots for additional accessories.

Best Overall: Bosch Benchtop Router Table RA1181

A blue Bosch router table with aluminum top.
Bosch

If you picked the best overall router we recommend, then the Bosch RA1181 Table is a no-brainer. It has a cast aluminum tabletop with a miter slot. The included base plate has pre-drilled holes for many standard routers, and you can drill more if necessary. It also comes with a split fence and quite a few accessories, including multiple feather boards, three mounting plate rings, and shims for jointing wood. This table is benchtop sized, so you’ll need to place it on another surface to get it to a comfortable height. As a bonus, this unit includes two plug spots, one for the router and one for a vacuum. Flipping the main switch engages both.

If you do have the Bosch 1617EVS router, you may want to consider picking up the optional under table base. The router will slip in and out of this base without having to unscrew it every time.

Best Overall

Bosch Benchtop Router Table RA1181

A good solid router table, this unit’s table is made of cast aluminum and includes a miter slot, several accessories, and supports mounting to a table permanently.

Best Budget: SKIL RAS800

A SKIL RAS800 red router table with storage pouch.
SKIL

The Skil router table goes for minimalism while still offering plenty of features. It comes pre-assembled (which is a rarity) and includes a handy attached storage pouch for all its accessories. You do give up something for the low cost, though: MDF is the material of choice here. And it doesn’t have a dedicated table plate, relying instead on clamps to hold your router in place. So doublecheck that your router fits first before buying. When you’re not using it, it folds up to a somewhat compact size. As a benchtop router, you’ll need to place it on another surface to use it.

Best Budget

SKIL RAS800 SKIL Router Table

This is the little router table that could. It uses an MDF tabletop with no separate plate. Helpfully it comes pre-assembled and folds down to a smaller size when you’re done.

Premium Pick: KREG Precision Router Table System

A Kreg Router table, showing blue full sized legs and upgraded fence.
Kreg

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iPad used as second display with Sidecar on macOS Catalina
Apple

The new Sidecar feature in macOS Catalina extends your Mac’s display to your iPad. With it, you can use your iPad as a secondary monitor or as a mirrored display that works with Apple Pencil and accessories like a mouse and keyboard.

How Sidecar Works

Once you have macOS Catalina installed on your Mac, you can connect your iPad to your computer and use it as an external display. It works both in a wired and wireless mode.

If you connect your iPad using a USB-C or Lightning cable, the connection is faster and more stable. But for most users, the wireless connection will work just as well. There’s no major lag as Apple uses its own Wi-Fi-based AirDrop-like peer-to-peer connection.

Sidecar UI showing Safari running How to Geek Website

Because of the peer-to-peer connection, Sidecar only has a 10-foot range. If you move to another room, you’ll notice lag and then a warning on the screen asking you to move closer to the Mac.

If you want to use the iPad as a portable display for a Mac around your house, you should look at Luna Display which works on a Wi-Fi network and has a longer range.

Once Sidecar is enabled, the iPad works as more than just a monitor. You’ll see a sidebar with controls and shortcuts, along with a virtual Touch Bar at the bottom of the screen. You can use touch, Apple Pencil, and a mouse to control the Mac display on your iPad.

Sidecar UI showing virtual Touch bar

While the touch UI does work, it’s not intuitive. If you were hoping that Sidecar would turn the Mac into an iPad where you’ll be able to use your fingers to tap on the screen and move around, alas, this is not it. The UI elements in Mac was quite small for this to work reliably.

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A hand holding an iPhone with the AirDrop settings menu open.
Aleksey Khilko/Shutterstock

AirDrop lets you send files, photos, and other data between iPhones, iPads, and Macs. Like all wireless tech, though, AirDrop can be temperamental. And getting devices to “see” each other can sometimes be a challenge. Here’s how to troubleshoot common AirDrop problems.

What Is AirDrop?

AirDrop is Apple’s proprietary method of sending files or data locally between two devices. The devices initially connect over Bluetooth, with Wi-Fi doing much of the heavy lifting when it comes to file transfers.

The feature was first introduced on Macs in 2008. It expanded to iOS devices with the rollout of iOS 7 in 2013. AirDrop is excellent when it works, but if you have older hardware, you’re more likely to experience issues. Visibility issues are the most common problem people have with AirDrop—sometimes, the recipient doesn’t show up, no matter how hard you try.

This is one of the reasons Apple introduced the new U1 chip with ultra-wideband technology for the iPhone 11. The U1 is designed to improve device discoverability and eliminate the issues that have plagued AirDrop for years. It will be a while before the majority of people have such a chip in their device, though. For now, we’re stuck trying to get AirDrop to work the old-fashioned way.

We’ve split these tips between Mac and iOS devices, as you can use different methods on each platform. If you want to use AirDrop between an iPhone or iPad, and a Mac, be sure to check out both sections for relevant tips.

Can My Mac or iOS Device Use AirDrop?

AirDrop is compatible with the following Mac computers:

  • MacBook Pro (late 2008 or newer)
  • MacBook Air (late 2010 or newer)
  • MacBook (late 2008 or newer)
  • iMac (early 2009 or newer)
  • Mac mini (mid-2010 or newer)
  • Mac Pro (early 2009 with AirPort Extreme or newer)

AirDrop is compatible with iOS devices that:

  • Run iOS 7 or later
  • Have a Lightning port

Despite this extensive compatibility, the older your device, the more likely you are to have issues with AirDrop.

Troubleshooting AirDrop on a Mac

There are more tricks to getting AirDrop working on a Mac than there are for an iOS device. This is because, on a Mac, you have access to the Terminal, more settings you can adjust, and the ability to delete files from system folders.

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A table full of spooky Halloween treats.
JeniFoto/Shutterstock

Don’t get tricked into spending hours on treats. Whether you’re seeking spooky sweets or savory snacks, we’ve got 10 things you can throw together fast. And they’re all perfect for that Halloween party you forgot all about.

Maybe it’s Thursday evening, and you just found a flyer in your son’s backpack that says he needs to bring thirty Halloween-themed treats to school on Friday. Or perhaps you forgot you told your neighbor you’d be in charge of snacks at this year’s block party.

Whatever the case, fall is a busy time of year, and there’s no shame in running out of time for homemade candied apples or from-scratch pumpkin pies.

With so many easy treat ideas floating around, you can put together a creepy culinary creation in less time than it takes to wrap a toilet-paper mummy. We’ve put together our 10 favorite ideas to make Halloween yummies in a hurry.

So, don’t worry about that party you forgot. Stop stressing over the fifty marshmallow spiderwebs you planned to prepare. Instead, use our handy list to create some simple, spooky snacks—fast!

Creepy Canapes

Nothing starts a party off right like a solid selection of finger foods. These grab-and-go options are sure to delight adults and children alike, and they don’t take more than 10 minutes to make.

Deviled eggs with black-olive spiders on top.
Kelly, A Side of Sweet
  • Pumpkin Pie Dip: Save the chips and salsa for summer and make this festive take on chips and dip, instead. Ready in just five minutes, it’s perfect for a last-minute gathering.

Get the Recipe: Cooking Classy

  • Celery Snails and Caterpillars: These little guys are a hit with younger ghouls and goblins, but we guarantee older spirits will enjoy them, as well. They just celery and peanut butter, but we can’t get enough of these cute creepy-crawlies.

Get the Recipe: Woman’s Day

  • Deviled Spider Eggs: Deviled eggs are a party platter classic. Add black olives to them, and you’ve got an arachnophobe’s worst nightmare.

Get the Recipe: A Side of Sweet

Sinful Sweets

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Red Hat logo at the company's office in Silicon Valley.
Michael Vi/Shutterstock.com

Sales of commercial Unix have fallen off a cliff. There has to be something behind this dramatic decline. Has Linux killed its ancestor by becoming a perfectly viable replacement, like an operating system version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers?

The Beginning of Unix

The initial release of Unix occurred fifty years ago in 1969, at Bell Labs, a research and development company owned by AT&T. Happy birthday, Unix. Actually, at that time it was still called Unics, standing for UNIplexed Information and Computing Service. Apparently, no one can recall when the “cs” became an “x.” It was written on a DEC PDP/7 computer, in DEC assembly language.

There was a need within Bell to produce typeset patent applications. The Unix development team identified that need as an opportunity to get their hands on the newer and more powerful DEC PDP/11/20 computer, so they quickly produced a typesetting program to generate the patent applications.  After this, the use of Unix steadily grew at Bell.

In 1973 Version 4 of Unix was released, re-written in the C programming language. The introduction to the accompanying manual had this to say: “The number of UNIX installations is now above 20, and many more are expected.” (K. Thompson and D. M. Richie, The UNIX Programmer’s Manual, 4th ed. November 1973.)

How little they knew! In 1973 Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie, two of the core Unix architects, presented a paper at a conference about Unix. Immediately they received requests for copies of the operating system.

Because of a consent decree that AT&T entered into with the US government in 1956, AT&T had to stay out of “any business other than the furnishing of common carrier communications services.” The upshot was they could license products from Bell Labs, but they couldn’t wholeheartedly productize them. So the Unix operating system was distributed as source code with a license, and costs that covered the shipping and packaging and a “reasonable royalty.”

Because AT&T couldn’t treat Unix as a product and didn’t put the usual wrap-around on it, Unix was given no marketing. It came with no support and without bug fixes. Despite this, Unix it spread into universities, military applications, and eventually the commercial world.

Because Unix had been rewritten in the C programming language, it was relatively easy to port it to new computer architectures, and soon Unix was running on all sorts of hardware. It had broken out of the confines of the DEC product range and could now run almost anywhere.

The Rise of Commercial Unix

In 1982, following another consent decree, AT&T was forced to relinquish control of Bell, and Bell was broken up into smaller, regional, companies. This upheaval released AT&T from some of their previous strictures. They were now able to productize Unix formally. In 1983 license fees were raised, and support and maintenance were finally available.

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The Essential "Project GEM" concept in hand.
Essential

If you follow mobile phone design, you’re familiar with Essential, an indie manufacturer that lit up the tech press but failed to find commercial success with its first phone. The company is showing off a new concept on Twitter.

While the first Essential phone kept the same basic slate profile of a modern smartphone and attempted innovation with a camera notch and modular add-ons, this “Project GEM” device is a more radical departure, with a much taller and slimmer silhouette. It basically looks like a standard Android phone, if you skewed it to 150% height and 50% width in Photoshop.

In less technical terms: if phone design was a piece of paper in a kindergarten classroom, a standard phone would be a “hamburger” fold. This Essential concept is a “hot dog” fold.

Beyond that, there’s not much to say about the hardware. It’s a phone (or maybe a TV remote? Hard to say.). It’s got the now-standard rounded corners on its super-tall screen. It has what looks like a cutout camera on the front, a camera with a large bump on the back, and a fingerprint reader. It’s running what looks like live (if not final) software, with a custom user interface making more efficient use of that odd-shaped screen than unmodified Android would. It appears to have multiple interactive panels, in a vaguely widget-like arrangement, on its long screen. We don’t know if it’s running Android like the original Essential PH-1, but given the operating system’s open source flexibility, that seems likely.

A screenshot of the Essential PH-1's camera attachment.
Essential tried—and failed—to make a splash with modular accessories on the PH-1. Essential

Assuming that there aren’t any huge surprises hiding in the hardware, one might be tempted to dismiss this as either an easy way to gauge interest, or a serious product that’s trying to find a profitable new niche. (And of course, it could be both.) Many manufacturers are looking for an edge with gentle innovations in hardware, like pop-up cameras from OnePlus to kill the screen notch. Sony is trying something similar to this Essential design, but far less extreme, with its extra-tall Xperia 1. The Palm brand has been resurrected to try and make super-tiny Android phones as “secondary” devices. And all that’s without mentioning more ambitious shifts, like folding phones from Samsung, Huawei, and others.

But there’s a more interesting way to approach this. Let’s give Essential the benefit of the doubt and assume that this will become a real flesh-and-blood (um, aluminum-and-glass?) product at some point. What problems would a super-long, super-skinny phone solve? This isn’t one of the radical Nokia designs of the mid-00s, where a company that thought it was invincible was creating insanely weird stuff, just because it could. This is, I would guess, a hardware and software team with specific goals, looking to redefine at least some of the ways that we interact with the ubiquitous slate phone form factor.

Essential

“We’ve been looking for a way to reframe your perspective on mobile,” the tweet says. And it’s not the first company to try and shake up a phone market that’s become predictable, if not outright boring (in a good way). If Essential wants to shift the standard form factor, it looks like they’re going to try to do so in a more gentle way than, say, the Galaxy Fold or Surface Duo. That’s a less exciting goal, but perhaps a more attainable one.

If you’re tempted to dismiss this as a Hail Mary pass from a company that’s failed to gain a foothold in the incredibly competitive smartphone market, I would suggest holding off. Recall that, when the original Galaxy Note came on the market with its “insanely big,” “colossal,” “gargantuan” 5.3-inch screen in 2011, it was met with similar scorn. The Galaxy Note is one of the best-selling lines on the planet, and it’s pushed every single manufacturer on the market into bigger and bigger phone screens, including the normally unshakable Apple. Ignoring seemingly odd design choices is something manufacturers do at their peril.

The original Galaxy Note
The Galaxy Note was “insanely big” in 2011. Today it’s smaller than the newest iPhone. Samsung

That said, the Galaxy Note had one of the biggest tech companies in the world behind it, and even in 2011 it was expanding on a growing trend. By comparison, Essential has name recognition among gadget news addicts, and that’s about it. If they want to shake up the smartphone market, they’ll need to demonstrate how that new form factor can actually benefit users. We’ll be excited to see what they come up with.

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The Essential "Project GEM" concept in hand.
Essential

If you follow mobile phone design, you’re familiar with Essential, an indie manufacturer that lit up the tech press but failed to find commercial success with its first phone. The company is showing off a new concept on Twitter.

While the first Essential phone kept the same basic slate profile of a modern smartphone and attempted innovation with a camera notch and modular add-ons, this “Project GEM” device is a more radical departure, with a much taller and slimmer silhouette. It basically looks like a standard Android phone, if you skewed it to 150% height and 50% width in Photoshop.

In less technical terms: if phone design was a piece of paper in a kindergarten classroom, a standard phone would be a “hamburger” fold. This Essential concept is a “hot dog” fold.

Beyond that, there’s not much to say about the hardware. It’s a phone (or maybe a TV remote? Hard to say.). It’s got the now-standard rounded corners on its super-tall screen. It has what looks like a cutout camera on the front, a camera with a large bump on the back, and a fingerprint reader. It’s running what looks like live (if not final) software, with a custom user interface making more efficient use of that odd-shaped screen than unmodified Android would. It appears to have multiple interactive panels, in a vaguely widget-like arrangement, on its long screen. We don’t know if it’s running Android like the original Essential PH-1, but given the operating system’s open source flexibility, that seems likely.

A screenshot of the Essential PH-1's camera attachment.
Essential tried—and failed—to make a splash with modular accessories on the PH-1. Essential

Assuming that there aren’t any huge surprises hiding in the hardware, one might be tempted to dismiss this as either an easy way to gauge interest, or a serious product that’s trying to find a profitable new niche. (And of course, it could be both.) Many manufacturers are looking for an edge with gentle innovations in hardware, like pop-up cameras from OnePlus to kill the screen notch. Sony is trying something similar to this Essential design, but far less extreme, with its extra-tall Xperia 1. The Palm brand has been resurrected to try and make super-tiny Android phones as “secondary” devices. And all that’s without mentioning more ambitious shifts, like folding phones from Samsung, Huawei, and others.

But there’s a more interesting way to approach this. Let’s give Essential the benefit of the doubt and assume that this will become a real flesh-and-blood (um, aluminum-and-glass?) product at some point. What problems would a super-long, super-skinny phone solve? This isn’t one of the radical Nokia designs of the mid-00s, where a company that thought it was invincible was creating insanely weird stuff, just because it could. This is, I would guess, a hardware and software team with specific goals, looking to redefine at least some of the ways that we interact with the ubiquitous slate phone form factor.

Essential

“We’ve been looking for a way to reframe your perspective on mobile,” the tweet says. And it’s not the first company to try and shake up a phone market that’s become predictable, if not outright boring (in a good way). If Essential wants to shift the standard form factor, it looks like they’re going to try to do so in a more gentle way than, say, the Galaxy Fold or Surface Duo. That’s a less exciting goal, but perhaps a more attainable one.

If you’re tempted to dismiss this as a Hail Mary pass from a company that’s failed to gain a foothold in the incredibly competitive smartphone market, I would suggest holding off. Recall that, when the original Galaxy Note came on the market with its “insanely big,” “colossal,” “gargantuan” 5.3-inch screen in 2011, it was met with similar scorn. The Galaxy Note is one of the best-selling lines on the planet, and it’s pushed every single manufacturer on the market into bigger and bigger phone screens, including the normally unshakable Apple. Ignoring seemingly odd design choices is something manufacturers do at their peril.

The original Galaxy Note
The Galaxy Note was “insanely big” in 2011. Today it’s smaller than the newest iPhone. Samsung

That said, the Galaxy Note had one of the biggest tech companies in the world behind it, and even in 2011 it was expanding on a growing trend. By comparison, Essential has name recognition among gadget news addicts, and that’s about it. If they want to shake up the smartphone market, they’ll need to demonstrate how that new form factor can actually benefit users. We’ll be excited to see what they come up with.

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The Essential "Project GEM" concept in hand.
Essential

If you follow mobile phone design, you’re familiar with Essential, an indie manufacturer that lit up the tech press but failed to find commercial success with its first phone. The company is showing off a new concept on Twitter.

While the first Essential phone kept the same basic slate profile of a modern smartphone and attempted innovation with a camera notch and modular add-ons, this “Project GEM” device is a more radical departure, with a much taller and slimmer silhouette. It basically looks like a standard Android phone, if you skewed it to 150% height and 50% width in Photoshop.

In less technical terms: if phone design was a piece of paper in a kindergarten classroom, a standard phone would be a “hamburger” fold. This Essential concept is a “hot dog” fold.

Beyond that, there’s not much to say about the hardware. It’s a phone (or maybe a TV remote? Hard to say.). It’s got the now-standard rounded corners on its super-tall screen. It has what looks like a cutout camera on the front, a camera with a large bump on the back, and a fingerprint reader. It’s running what looks like live (if not final) software, with a custom user interface making more efficient use of that odd-shaped screen than unmodified Android would. It appears to have multiple interactive panels, in a vaguely widget-like arrangement, on its long screen. We don’t know if it’s running Android like the original Essential PH-1, but given the operating system’s open source flexibility, that seems likely.

A screenshot of the Essential PH-1's camera attachment.
Essential tried—and failed—to make a splash with modular accessories on the PH-1. Essential

Assuming that there aren’t any huge surprises hiding in the hardware, one might be tempted to dismiss this as either an easy way to gauge interest, or a serious product that’s trying to find a profitable new niche. (And of course, it could be both.) Many manufacturers are looking for an edge with gentle innovations in hardware, like pop-up cameras from OnePlus to kill the screen notch. Sony is trying something similar to this Essential design, but far less extreme, with its extra-tall Xperia 1. The Palm brand has been resurrected to try and make super-tiny Android phones as “secondary” devices. And all that’s without mentioning more ambitious shifts, like folding phones from Samsung, Huawei, and others.

But there’s a more interesting way to approach this. Let’s give Essential the benefit of the doubt and assume that this will become a real flesh-and-blood (um, aluminum-and-glass?) product at some point. What problems would a super-long, super-skinny phone solve? This isn’t one of the radical Nokia designs of the mid-00s, where a company that thought it was invincible was creating insanely weird stuff, just because it could. This is, I would guess, a hardware and software team with specific goals, looking to redefine at least some of the ways that we interact with the ubiquitous slate phone form factor.

Essential

“We’ve been looking for a way to reframe your perspective on mobile,” the tweet says. And it’s not the first company to try and shake up a phone market that’s become predictable, if not outright boring (in a good way). If Essential wants to shift the standard form factor, it looks like they’re going to try to do so in a more gentle way than, say, the Galaxy Fold or Surface Duo. That’s a less exciting goal, but perhaps a more attainable one.

If you’re tempted to dismiss this as a Hail Mary pass from a company that’s failed to gain a foothold in the incredibly competitive smartphone market, I would suggest holding off. Recall that, when the original Galaxy Note came on the market with its “insanely big,” “colossal,” “gargantuan” 5.3-inch screen in 2011, it was met with similar scorn. The Galaxy Note is one of the best-selling lines on the planet, and it’s pushed every single manufacturer on the market into bigger and bigger phone screens, including the normally unshakable Apple. Ignoring seemingly odd design choices is something manufacturers do at their peril.

The original Galaxy Note
The Galaxy Note was “insanely big” in 2011. Today it’s smaller than the newest iPhone. Samsung

That said, the Galaxy Note had one of the biggest tech companies in the world behind it, and even in 2011 it was expanding on a growing trend. By comparison, Essential has name recognition among gadget news addicts, and that’s about it. If they want to shake up the smartphone market, they’ll need to demonstrate how that new form factor can actually benefit users. We’ll be excited to see what they come up with.

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Motorola One Macro
Motorola

If you’re looking for a smartphone capable of macro photography, you won’t have to pay $599 for the OnePlus 7T when it launches on October 18—the Motorola One Macro is also available this month for around $140.

Motorola’s “One” series of smartphones are known for having particularly good specifications on one aspect of the device. The Motorola One Power emphasized good battery life, the One Vision touted a 48-megapixel rear cam and 25-megapixel front cam, the One Action packed a dedicated ultra-wide action camera, and now the Motorola One Macro has focused on implementing a dedicated rear macro lens.

The macro lens is capable of getting five times closer to an object than you can with a normal camera, allowing for extreme close-up shots of small things like bugs, flowers, coins, and so on. Motorola also notes that the One Macro handset features a quad-sensor camera configuration and laser autofocus on its main camera, yet this model is cheaper than the One Vision or One Action smartphones.

Of course, being a $140 device, the One Macro doesn’t have the fastest or most capacious chips available, but it gets by with a 2GHz octa-core MediaTek processor, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of storage (expandable to 512GB)—and then again, all the camera sensors. All told, the One Macro is packing an 8-megapixel front camera along with this array on the back: 13MP (main camera) + 2MP (depth sensor) + 2MP (macro lens with phase detection autofocus).

Other specs include a 6.2-inch display with a resolution of 1520 x 720, dual SIM or single SIM + microSD, a 4000mAh non-removable battery, a fingerprint reader, Bluetooth 4.2 connectivity, a 3.5mm headphone jack, USB-C charging, Android 9 Pie, and a water repellent design.

One Macro, front and back
Motorola

As for whether the One Macro is any good at what it’s meant to do, reviews online indicate that it works best with good lighting and when objects are stationary because focusing can sometimes be problematic in poor lighting and with objects that are moving. Getting crisp shots in ideal conditions sounds reliable enough and if nothing else, the One Macro’s macro camera probably works fine for the price point of this phone.

Units are set to begin shipping in India on October 12 and you can order from Flipkart for Rs. 9,999, or about $140. Worldwide pricing and availability is expected on October 24.

Source: Motorola

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Jack Skellington holding up his head in front of the moon.
Buena Vista Pictures

If you want to binge some Halloween movies, but aren’t sure where to start, check out the 31 Nights of Halloween List; you can spend less time pondering and more time watching.

For years, the Freeform channel has published the 31 Nights of Halloween List, which is actually the channel’s Halloween movie schedule, and this year is no exception. You can watch the station both locally and online. Or use the list as inspiration and plan a binge-watching session of movies from your own collection or streaming services.

You could also just put The Nightmare Before Christmas or Hocus Pocus on repeat until Halloween—we won’t judge.

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Apple Watch Emergency Settings
Justin Duino

The Apple Watch might be a great smartwatch, but it can also save your life. Apple has built fall detection into the wearable, which can call 911 and alert your emergency contacts in case you’re involved in an accident. Here’s how to set everything up.

Enable Fall Detection

When you first set up your Apple Watch, it should have asked if you’d like to enable fall detection and emergency services. If you didn’t turn the feature on (or want to make sure you did), start by opening the “Watch” app on your iPhone.

If you can’t find the app on your iPhone, swipe down on your homescreen and use Apple’s Spotlight search to find “Watch.”

Apple iPhone Select Watch App

Scroll down in the “My Watch” tab and select “Emergency SOS.”

Apple iPhone Watch App Select Emergency SOS

Tap on the toggle next to “Fall Detection.” Doing so will alert 911 and your emergency contacts that you’ve potentially been injured and didn’t respond to an alarm coming from the Apple Watch.

Apple iPhone Watch App Toggle Fall Detection

Alternatively, you can enable fall detection from your Apple Watch. You can do this by clicking on the Digital Crown > Settings app (gear icon) > SOS > Fall detection. Toggle the option on if it wasn’t already.

Set Up Emergency Contacts

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