Pilot fish is the non-IT IT guy for about 30 fellow cubicle farmers — the person the others turn to before calling IT with a problem. Comes one morning when fish is late, and one of his neighbors with a flickering CRT monitor can’t wait to ask for fish’s help. So when fish does arrive, he sees three guys from IT gathered around that flickering monitor, stumped. They have changed the monitor, the graphics card, the refresh rate, all to no avail. 

Fish enters his neighbor’s cubicle, moves his new desk fan one foot to the right, and — voilà! — the flicker is gone. 

The three IT guys all leave without comment.

Sharky is a big fan of true tales of IT life. Send me yours at sharky@computerworld.com. You can also subscribe to the Daily Shark Newsletter and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.

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Google last week issued Chrome 73, an update that added support for desktop “Progressive Web Apps” on Macs and consolidated settings – both old and new – that let users opt out of Google’s services.

Chrome 73 also patched 60 vulnerabilities; security researchers who reported nine of them were paid a total of $13,500 in bug bounties. Other flaws’ rewards had not yet been calculated by Google.

Chrome updates in the background, so most users can just relaunch the browser to install the latest iteration. To manually update, select “About Google Chrome” from the Help menu under the vertical ellipsis at the upper right; the resulting tab either shows the browser has been updated or displays the download process before presenting a “Relaunch” button. Those new to Chrome can download version 73 in versions for Windows, macOS and Linux from this Google website.

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Five days into its life, we’re still trying to figure out what Android Q is all about — what will come to define this latest Android release and end up having the most impact on us, as nose-breathing mammals who rely it on to power our cellular telephony gadgets.

We won’t truly know Q’s defining features until the software’s further along in its development and all of its elements have been revealed, but having used it for several days now, some intriguing areas of progress are coming into focus — areas where Google is clearly working on refining the user experience and, in small but potentially significant measures, turning Android into an even more effective productivity tool.

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Apple’s newly updated iMacshave plenty to offer enterprise and consumer users, not least its faster processors and much-improved graphics performance.

At the movies

It is interesting to note that Apple chose to announce these new Macs with nothing but a press release, even though they’ve not seen significant update since WWDC 2017.

This likely reflects the importance with which the company sees the launch of its disintermediated video streaming service in March 2019.

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Why do so many people in the business IT community still make fun of fax?

And no, we’re not questioning whether fax is worthy of a few jokes.

Of course it is.

In an era of smartphones and instantaneous, cloud-based data transfer, most companies’ fax setups rely on paper, ink drums, and the twentieth-century telephone network. Ha, ha.

office space faxing thats be great eFax Corporate

No, we’re asking why we still hear fax jokes at all (while people long ago stopped making snarky remarks about, say, mimeograph machines and tape recorders). Have you guessed the answer yet?

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A pair of Windows 10 feature upgrades will soon collide, with one just beginning to get traction on PCs as its successor readies for release.

It’s unclear how Microsoft will handle the dilemma, which traces its roots to the debacle last year when the company was forced to pull the fall feature upgrade after it deleted user files without permission.

According to AdDuplex, a Lithuanian company whose technology is embedded in thousands of Windows Store apps, Windows 10 October 2018 Update – 1809 in Microsoft’s yymm labeling format – powered just 21% of surveyed Windows 10 systems as of Feb. 25.

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Pilot fish is helping his pastor fine-tune the church LAN when he notices that the day-care facility next door has a wide-open and unsecured Wi-Fi connection.

Fish’s pastor wants to connect to the day-care center’s printer and print a document saying, “This is from your neighbors. You need to tighten the security on your Wi-Fi.”

Fish suggests that they instead print a document that says, “This is from God. You need to go to church. There’s a really nice one right next door.”

“Too bad the pastor overruled me,” says fish.

Sharky wants your true tale of IT life. If you can’t send it directly to my printer, email it to me at sharky@computerworld.com. You can also subscribe to the Daily Shark Newsletter and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.

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Many enterprise users will be interested to learn that Apple has introduced significantly faster iPad mini and iPad air models – they may also be interested to learn about new features the company will soon introduce in Pages, Keynote, Numbers that make its free productivity suite even more useful for enterprise pros.

iWork is about to become even more useful

Look around and you’ll frequently find tablets, mostly iPads, in use in real world business scenarios.

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Need to get up to speed on the latest features in Excel 2016? Wrestling with an old version of Word? Looking to get more out of Windows 10? Computerworld’s cheat sheets are easy-to-use guides to help you navigate Microsoft’s core productivity apps.

Here’s a one-stop resource where you can find in-depth stories on several generations of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook for Windows, focusing on what’s new in each major release. We’ve also got guides for SharePoint, OneNote, Microsoft Teams and Windows itself.

Microsoft’s subscription-based office suite, Office 365, is continually updated with new features, and the company recently released Office 2019, its latest non-subscription office suite. We’ll be publishing new cheat sheets to cover those products, but we’re willing to bet that many companies and individuals will stay on older versions of the standalone software for some time to come. We’ve got you covered here.

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