In theory, when Windows 10 version 1903 rolls out in late May, we’ll suddenly have tools at hand that’ll make it easy to temporarily turn off automatic updating. I’m not yet convinced that all will be milk and honey, but for now there’s every reason to take control of your machine and turn off automatic updating. Wait for the dust to clear before you apply the next round of patches.

By introducing new patch-blocking capabilities in Win10 version 1903, Microsoft’s implicitly acknowledging what you and I have known for a long time: Windows (and sometimes Office and .NET) patches have a nasty habit of clobbering machines. It makes no sense to join the first line of cannon fodder. Far better to wait and, if the coast is clear, patch when millions of our compatriots have participated in the grand unpaid beta test.

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from Computerworld http://bit.ly/2Vvh9TZ
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Apple now sees AI as being as important in its own right as its retail, services, hardware, software or design arms – and that’s why machine intelligence now has a seat on its executive board.

How Apple works

Think about how Apple works. Former CEO, Steve Jobs, deliberately organized the company so that it fostered topic-related expertise.

Company executives reflect this – most have been involved in their department (marketing or hardware design) for the majority of their Apple careers. They are experts in their field.

What this means is that different teams have different needs and different responsibilities. That’s why a procurement official sent to China to source components for an unreleased and unannounced Apple device didn’t realise they were ordering the parts for the original iPhone until after the product was announced.

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from Computerworld http://bit.ly/2Vv1GTR
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Microsoft last week said the next Windows 10 feature upgrade will be available for all users to download and install sometime in late May – the third straight postponement for Windows 10. The decision illustrates the strain under which Microsoft’s Windows-as-a-service model has been operating of late. What had been billed as a metronomic every-six-months release schedule for the feature-and-functionality upgrades has faltered, burdened by months-long delays.

Windows 10 1803 – last year’s April upgrade in Microsoft’s yymm format – launched about a month late. Microsoft claimed that the fall refresh, Windows 10 1809, was officially just one month behind but in reality 1809 was at least three months late. In both instances, Microsoft extended support so each received the promised 18 months of bug fixes.

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from Computerworld http://bit.ly/2IpGdHY
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It’s a sizzling summer season at this retailer, and the main server has failed for the second time in a month, reports a pilot fish on the scene.

“CEO is rather upset, and calls IT consultant and demands immediate action,” fish says. “IT consultant responds that he proposed investment in some cooling for the server room the year before, but it was deemed unnecessary.”

CEO deems it necessary now and agrees to the investment, and the consultant works out the details of a deal with a local contractor to put in the new air conditioning system quickly.

Two days later, the contractor calls and reports that all work has been done as agreed, and the new cooling system is up and running.

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from Computerworld http://bit.ly/2UnajDb
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(Insider Story)

from Computerworld http://bit.ly/2Ga0Oh5
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