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Throwback Thursday: How did…er, DIDN’T he do that?

It’s 1977, and this network analyst pilot fish is working at a newly constructed data center — one with a big fence.

“The company had just gotten a new sense of needing physical security, so they had included a new, state-of-the-art security system,” says fish.

“It had electronic locks at a handful of doors in the building, a 10-foot-high fence with a motorized gate, and key-card reader stations by each of the locked doors and the gate.”

One day, company needs to bring a new communications line up between the data center and an office 10 miles away. Fish’s team leader decides the best way to do this without disrupting the users is to have fish go to the remote office at 4:30 a.m., while his team leader goes to the data center.

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Office 365: A guide to the updates

Office 365 subscribers always have the latest version of Microsoft Office — currently Office 2016. They also get more frequent software updates than those who have purchased Office 2016 without a subscription, which means subscribers have access to the latest features, security patches and bug fixes. But it can be hard to keep track of the changes in each update and know when they’re available. We’re doing this for you, so you don’t have to.

Following are key updates to Office 365 for Windows since Office 2016 was released in September 2015 — all the 2017 updates and the most important ones from 2016 and late 2015, with the latest releases shown first. We’ll add info about new updates as they’re rolled out.

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U.S. Treasury: Regulators should back off FinTech, allow innovation

The Treasury Department recently released a report urging state and federal regulators to revamp outdated statutes and support technological innovations such as AI, machine learning and blockchain that could make the U.S. financial system more nimble and competitive.

The 222-page report, commissioned by the Trump Administration 18 months ago, focused on non-bank financial services firms, such as credit lending, servicing organizations and payments networks, as well as FinTech companies – tech vendors focused on innovation.

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Patch Tuesday fallout: Bad docs, but so far no major problems

Microsoft may have fixed July’s horrible, no good, very bad patches. Although the initial documentation for this month’s patches included warnings about many of the bugs that persisted from July, it ends up that the docs were wrong, and most of the known problems seem to be fixed.

As of early Reboot Wednesday morning, the patches seem to be behaving themselves. Of course, it frequently takes days or even weeks for bugs to appear, so you’d be well advised to avoid jumping into the unpaid battle zone for now.

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How Apple could redesign money

Like most big corporations, Apple’s financial statements always warnthat currency fluctuation poses risks to its business performance – but it could mitigate such risk, perhaps with its own virtual money.

More stable than currency

The problem with currency decline is that it impacts prices, revenues and can impact a company’s projected performance.

A Decluttr survey last year revealed that iPhones hold value longer than other smartphone brands. (At a stretch, you could argue that this makes them a more stable financial investment than some currencies).

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(Insider Story)

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Data conversion? What could be easier?

This small IT service provider has two new customers about a hundred miles apart — and a serious barrier to serving one of them, reports a pilot fish working there.

“One of the customers had a cartridge tape unit attached to their existing system, but we couldn’t read those cartridges,” fish says. “The other customer had a system with both a cartridge tape drive and an open-reel drive that handled tapes our system could read.”

Fish knows it should be possible to use the second customer’s data center as a conversion facility to move data between cartridges and reels for the first customer — at least in theory.

Second customer is willing to give that arrangement a try. First customer creates a cartridge tape for a trial data-conversion test, and fish picks it up and drives to the second customer’s data center.

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from Computerworld https://ift.tt/2MxwC4J

A hidden Android Pie security setting everyone should enable

Google’s new Android 9 Pie release has plenty of fresh features and interface changes, but one of the software’s most significant security improvements has managed to stay mostly off the radar.

In addition to all of the oft-discussed privacy and security enhancements, y’see, Pie has an out-of-sight and semi-advanced option. It’s not something you’d use every day — or often at all, really — but if the right sort of occasion ever comes along, you’ll be glad you have it enabled.

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from Computerworld https://ift.tt/2P9SSA3

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